Valletta Grand Harbour Entrance live cam
View of the lighthouse and Fort Ricasoli from the port entrance

Valletta Grand Harbour Entrance

It is the pearl of the Mediterranean and one of the most impressive baroque cities in the world, the Maltese capital of Valletta (Il-Belt Valletta) was officially recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO due to its huge cultural importance.

Valletta is a wonderful city surrounded by an incredible tradition of history and culture, here the rich heritage of the ancient mixes perfectly with the chaotic rhythm of modern life, its tourist offer includes a variety of attractions, monuments, ancient architectural treasures, churches and modern accommodation facilities, moreover it can be visited within a few hours; allowing ourselves time to relax amid the charming gardens of the city while enjoying its panoramic views, among the most beautiful in the world, will be a great experience! The gallant past of Valletta is still today represented by the imposing fortifications and bastions around it, their remains have survived both the First and the Second World War as well as a number of natural disasters; Valletta's origins date back to the early 16th century when the Knights Hospitaller (also known as the Hospitallers and later Knights of Saint John or Knights of Malta) decided to construct a new fortified city on the inhospitable Sciberras Peninsula under the guide of the Grandmaster Jean Parisot de la Valette (after whom it was named); the Great Siege of 1565 fortified the Order's position in Malta and the 'Humilissima Civitas Valettae' (the Most Humble City of Valletta) was known as the most exclusive fortress in Europe; thanks to its strategic position in the heart of the Mediterranean Valletta became over the centuries not only a powerful fortress city but also a strongpoint of culture and economy in the world enriched by two natural and prestigious harbours, Marsamxett (Il-Port ta' Marsamxett) and the Grand Harbour (Il-Port il-Kbir) both badly damaged during the Second World War; the harbours grew and expanded quickly, improved with extensive docks and wharves they were among the most fortified and safest harbours in Europe, the British Royal Navy settled here until 1979 and undertook a number of projects to improve the harbours and dockyard facilities partially damaged during the world wars; completely restored, they are today the premier destinations for yachts, superyachts and cruise ships and give the opportunity to take a boat ride if weather permits, how romantic would be to enjoy a delightful night harbour cruise by a Maltese boat? Imposing bastions and fortifications scattered all over the city are tangible testimonies to a glorious past, Grand Harbour for example is surrounded by Fort Saint Elmo (Il-Forti Sant Iermu), Fort Ricasoli (Forti Rikazoli), the picturesque village of Kalkara (Il-Kalkara) and the fortified Three Cities, Vittoriosa (Birgu), Cospicua (Bormla) and Senglea (L-Isla).

Cam on-line since: 07/16/2013

Comments

  • avatar
    • 2 weeks ago
    • Margaret Taylor

    Gary/Ann, just been reading your comments, although I look at the Tigne camera for some reason it had never crossed my mind that you could see the ships leaving/arriving from this one. Sure enough, even on an awful morning I was able to see EOS in the distance! Thank you.

  • avatar
    • 2 weeks ago
    • Ann Galea

    You're welcome Gary. I will have to take a look at the Tigné cam the next time a ship departs. It never crossed my mind so thank you for the suggestion !

  • avatar
    • 2 weeks ago
    • Gary R. Orris.

    Thanks Ann,
    I did follow the two British Hotel cams as well and have to agree with you .... they are great views. Then watching the Tigne cam you can see the ships as they depart Grand Harbour. I can also see (Just) the Road Devil kiosk, where my wife and I stop regularly when we visit Malta.
    Regards ............ Gary

  • avatar
    • 2 weeks ago
    • Ann Galea

    Gary, you can almost never catch a ship leaving on this cam but for some reason the arrivals are ok most of the time. The Birgu cam does the same thing most times with both departures and arrivals. Therefore I prefer to catch the ships on the 2 British Hotel cams cause not only are the views great but they are the most reliable. Hope this helps !

  • avatar
    • 2 weeks ago
    • Gary R. Orris.

    Ah the good old "Cruise Ship curse" strikes again.....watching the 1800 departure of The Jewel of the Seas then just as it reached the harbour entrance cam, the cam went offline. It was offline for approx 4 minutes by which time the ship had passed. You could just see the stern in the distance.
    I did manage to see it exit via the Tigne cam, although distant.
    Better luck next time.... Regards, Gary

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • debbie morris

    typo bigger ship and she is beautiful.

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    wor Aida approaching grand harbour at 11.50

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • debbie morris

    smaller aida ship but just as beautiful.

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    waiting for wor Aida coming in .gan canny lass.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Dee

    DEREK! She's not! lol

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Dee shes late! I haven't watched any of the cruise ships com in for a while so ma follow Jade through all the cameras.Gan canny an nee dunchin them jetty's

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Margaret Taylor

    Derek, according to my list she's due in at 12 local time, so she's only a little late.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Dee

    Derek, no she's due in at 12.00pm!

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Norwegian Jade on her way ,is she running late? as on vessel finder she was due in at 10.00. gan canny

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • debbie morris

    watching the pilot meet the cruise ship I haven't managed to catch that before.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • JCC

    Schooner Sea Cloud going through breakwater on the way to Trapani. Unfortunately without wind power an unfurled sails.