Grand Harbour Entrance from the British Hotel live camWonderful view of the Grand Harbour entrance and Fort Ricasoli

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Comments

  • avatar
    • 4 days ago
    • Stewart Wilson

    DEREK I put the link on one of the camera pages I forget witch one :(

  • avatar
    • 4 days ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Stewart. I can remember waiting at that police box with the copper on duty directing the traffic in my me 1 consul with vitually no hand brake.

  • avatar
    • 4 days ago
    • Stewart Wilson

    DEREK when you think we had the first Police Box in the market place with traffic cameras in the world there's you tube video of them for anyone who would like to see how narrow the streets were when traffic was king now it's diverted and you can walk with out fear of getting hit by the Bus :)

  • avatar
    • 4 days ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Pamela . we also have miles of coast plus the various harbours to watch.

  • avatar
    • 4 days ago
    • Pamela

    Hear, hear Derek, about the cams in Newcastle and Durham. We have an awful lot to offer here in the North East *thumbs up*

  • avatar
    • 5 days ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Stewart. I first visited Malta in Feb 2013 after wanting to visit for decades, then once home I looked up the visit malta web site and found the cameras, then one day up popped this link and as they say the rest is history.

  • avatar
    • 5 days ago
    • Stewart Wilson

    DEREK, snap ref the cams across the water I think the first time I knew about them was when the PM was there about 3 years ago :)

  • avatar
    • 6 days ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Stewart. That crain silo cam and the one accross Golden bay were the ones that started me off on these ones, I seem to spend half me life on them, now we have the street level ones too! Yes I do know about Durham could do with cameras in Newcastle and Durham.

  • avatar
    • 6 days ago
    • Stewart Wilson

    thank you for that bit of information DEREK :) I have know it be with less ships here but that was when I was looking from the Grain tower camera but the view was not so good and nothing like these cameras fantastic views shame that they don't have one at Durham Cathedral :) it's nearly 1000 years old I expect you know that :)

  • avatar
    • 1 week ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Stewart. They do move but only when you are not looking.

  • avatar
    • 1 week ago
    • Stewart Wilson

    do these ships ever go anywhere they seem to be tide up day and night :)

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Dougie2. A bit more information on Scott Dobson he died in 1986 And is buried in Gozo. And on his grave stone are the words GAN CANNY

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Dougie2. Further to the Geordie language I can recommend the learned document by Scott Dobson Larn Yersel Geordie.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Dougie2

    But how would you put it, Kernow Lad?

Grand Harbour Entrance from the British Hotel

Grand Harbour (Il-Port il-Kbir) is one of the most beautiful natural harbours in the world, a gem for the Mediterranean and a prestigious landmark for the Maltese capital city.

Already in use since Phoenician times when it already offered the ideal and safe conditions for mooring, this harbour has been the base for the Knights of St. John, was greatly improved over the centuries with docks and wharves and finally massively fortified during the period of the British Military, today it appears as one of the most important destinations and luxury marinas for sailing boats, motorboats, superyachts and cruise ships even longer than 300 meters.

Grand Harbour is bounded by Fort St. Elmo (Il-Forti Sant Iermu), Fort Ricasoli (Forti Rikazoli) and the Sceberras Peninsula, its predominant position in the heart of the Mediterranean made it a strategic military base for a long time but at the same time too exposed; as a consequence Napoleon and his fleet sailed into Valletta’s Grand Harbour at the end of the 18th century, after his brief and unsuccessful occupation that led to a drastic decrease of traffic, Malta became years later a British colony, tangible reminders of the British colonial rule are today many splendid fortifications, bastions and towers all around; British have truly left their mark with a wider entrance, harbour amenities, a greater anchorage, new houses, structure and churches were rebuilt, Valletta started to enjoy a new era of prosperity focusing mainly on the multi-purpose Grand Harbour; unfortunately it was savagely bombed during World War II by Italian forces that caused much destruction. Today Grand Harbour offers safe anchorage in all weathers and high quality services, it encloses the wonderful city of Valletta, officially recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and visited every day by a multitude of tourists from all over the world.

The southeast side is embellished by a number of inlets and promontories, the picturesque village of Kalkara (Il-Kalkara) and by the fortified Three Cities, that is Vittoriosa (Birgu), Cospicua (Bormla) and Senglea (L-Isla); on the left side of the Grand Harbour entrance and on the opposite side of Fort St. Elmo is located the above-mentioned Fort Ricasoli, a large fortification in the promontory known as Gallows Point built by the Knights of Malta at the end of the 17th century and named after its main financier, the Italian knight Giovanni Francesco Ricasoli; originally constructed to give protection to the Grand Harbour, it was active during the British rule but suffered greatly during the Second World War, much of the entire structure was damaged, the evidence of its so fascinating remains are still visible all around, however it enjoys wonderful panoramic views over Valletta and its surroundings.

Just for curiosity: Fort Ricasoli and its walls have been chosen and used as a filming location for successful films such as Gladiator, Agora, Helen of Troy and Julius Caesar.

Cam on-line since: 06/01/2013