Bruges - Market Square live camBruges, view of the Market Square near the Belfry bell tower from the Olive Tree Restaurant

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Comments

  • avatar
    • 9 hours ago
    • Richard Martin

    Wave really slow Steve, and for a long time. Then if we play the "time-lapse" it'll look like you're there in real time. Have a great trip!

  • avatar
    • 1 day ago
    • steve

    Will be here next Sun morning, oh I hope to be able to find the cam and give a wave.

  • avatar
    • 1 day ago
    • %arc

    Too bad the new layout will block us from viewing the magnificent light decoration on the ice rink

  • avatar
    • 1 day ago
    • Richard Martin

    And thanks Sam. You mentioned my supposed violation of the "Terms of Service" then go on to tell the history of the poem and its author. My gesture was out of respect on page of a webcam in the region where the poem was meant to depict. On the 100th anniversary of the armistice. I knew of this poem maybe 30-35 years before the internet existed and the word viral meant in the nature of a virus. Again I respect your opinion and appreciate your informing comments. Best wishes and the same to all.

  • avatar
    • 1 day ago
    • Richard Martin

    What ever Sam. The poem has a meaning you failed grasp. Have a great day.

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    the poem and its author have a dichotomy of events , please understand I don't like saying this , only the news of the death of the Queen will go more viral than of this poem. Written over 100 years ago. Heart strings of almost all, were, and still are stretched beyond when reading these few words, His words, the author's will live. The other side of the story : Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae died before the end of the fighting. Cause of death, disease. More deadly than weapon injury.

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Wayne

    EnJoy""""EnJoy""""

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    ❤ The OLIVE TREE Restaurant brings together the warm tradition of Greek hospitality with delicious Greek-Mediterranean Cuisine, updated with a contemporary twist. ❤ my thanks, what a great place

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    Ironic %arc mentions security measures, *sigh* , When Will They Ever Learn : by Pete Seeger : OH! look! Holiday illumination. Please book ahead at our hosts establishment. you will EnJoy'... go ahead say it

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    'In Flanders Fields' is one of the most notable poems written during World War I, perhaps even the most famous war poem of all time. Canadian physician and Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae wrote it on 3 May 1915, after he witnessed the death of his friend, Lieutenant Alexis Helmer, 22 years old, the day before. ___Baiting with 5 lines of 15 , where 15 lines would have shown respect. Post the whole poem, please, it poignant.

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Mel P

    Thanks for info @%arc. Always enjoy your comments because I know you have experience of actually visiting the places you comment on, rather than posting snippets from Wikipedia. Can't wait to go back to beautiful Bruges. May not make it for the Xmas markets, but will be there in the Spring.

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    I2nov18-- In the USofA we call 11 / 11 Veterans Day, In Canada it is named Remembrance Day. US of A also has a national holiday : Memorial Day late in May for remembering the people who died while serving in the country's armed forces. julie , I wore a uniform for my country for 4 years.. Did you? EnJoy EnJoy

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    ha, see 11hour 11 day 11 month silly boy the year was 18

  • avatar
    • 2 days ago
    • Capture Sam

    The eleventh hour of the eleventh month of the eleventh year is when the armistice was signed by Germany and the Allies at Compiègne, France ending most of the fighting. The Treaty of Versailles, which was signed on June 28, 1919, and took effect on January 10, 1920 was the end of the war.

Bruges - Market Square

Market Square (Grote Markt) is the heart of the stunning medieval city of Bruges (Brugge), with an area of about 1 hectare it is the center of the commercial life and the ideal spot where a variety of social, political, and religious events take place.

Today the square is one of the most important must-see attractions, hundreds of tourists and locals transit here every day delighted by the fact that after the renovation works of 1995 parking was finally removed and the whole area became mostly traffic-free, a real pedestrian's dream; Market Square is dominated by the impressive medieval (1220) 83 meter high Belfry Tower (or Beffroi), one of the city's most prominent landmarks; its magnificent 47-bell carillon continues to peal out over the city every quarter hour, although thrice destroyed and rebuilt, from its top it still offers breathtaking views over the whole Bruges; declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 2000, this stunning city still keeps its original late medieval features so that is one of the most well-preserved medieval cities in Europe; whether we decide to explore the city simply on foot or in a horse-drawn carriage we'll be equally captured by the magical atmosphere of this so picturesque town while enjoying a charming transportation to the medieval. Its attractions also include the Cloth Hall, the imposing Provincial Palace in neo-gothic style, the statue of the patriotic heroes Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck also decorates the square while many shops and restaurants are surrounded by old buildings and houses. Very little information dates from the pre-roman age, anyway it seems that Bruges was founded as a fortress-city in the 9th century by Vikings who settled here (the Dutch name "Brugge" seems to have come originally from "Bryggja" meaning "harbour or mooring place"); the growing prosperity of the city made it rapidly one of the most important maritime capitals of Europe until the 16th century when Bruges entered a period of stagnation. For a longtime it was at the center of the chronic struggle between England and France, this situation led to many revolts, The Bruges Matins (Brugse Metten), which saw armed insurrectionists led by de Coninck and Breydel, is absolutely worth mentioning.

Bruges, capital of West Flanders, is today a real city-museum, a charming scenery filled with incredible history, although its size, there is a lot to see and do, our tour should also include a visit to museums and ancient buildings (such as the Groeninge Museum and the gothic Palace of Gruuthuse, magnificent masterpieces of Flemish architecture) and churches, cafès and shops still working according to ancient techniques; it is assumed that the manufacturing of lace started during Ancient Rome, anyway this tradition is still strongly alive and an important resource even if the city knows other growing economic sectors, it is a world famous chocolate hotspot with a variety of chocolatiers and shops and a paradise for all lovers of beer; walking through the picturesque streets of Bruges we'll be invaded by chocolate shops, pubs and lace boutiques with all kinds of gifts, it will be furthermore interesting a visit to the Lace Museum with its permanent exhibitions showing several lace varieties, a must-see for all lovers of craftsmanship of high quality. Our tour in Bruges, also known as "Venice of the North" due to its picturesque canals, should also include a delightful boat ride while appreciating the charming surrounding scenery including the Saint John's House Mill (Sint Janshuismolen) and the Koelewei Mill (Koeleweimolen).

Bruges has also been designated as European Capital of Culture in 2002 due to its significant cultural importance in architecture as well as painting, moreover it was well represented by the important poet and priest Guido Gezelle, the house in which he was born is today used as a literary and didactic museum.

Cam on-line since: 08/07/2012