Rome - Pantheon live cam
Rome, view of the Pantheon, Piazza della Rotonda, the fountain and the Obelisk of Ramses II

Rome - Pantheon

Rome's Pantheon or Temple of All Gods is one of the best-preserved monuments handed down by the Empire. As the Latin inscription on the front of the temple announces “M•AGRIPPA•L•F•COS•TERTIVM•FECIT”, the Pantheon was built by Marcus Agrippa, son-in-law of the first Roman Emperor, Augustus, in 27-25 BC.
Ongoing debates concern both the name and shape of the Pantheon. The aforementioned Latin inscription mistakenly led to believe that the present-day circular temple coincided with the first original building, archeological digs later confirmed that Agrippa’s construction presented a traditional rectangular t-shaped form that went destroyed in a fire in 80 AD leaving only the façade. Emperor Domitian rebuilt the temple, but in 110 AD it suffered a similar fate only this time it was struck by lightning. The current Pantheon, dating back to 118-125 AD, can be attributed to Emperor Hadrian and appears today exactly as it was in Ancient Rome. The inscription was maintained as a homage to Agrippa. Originally intended as a sacred temple, the Pantheon was later converted into a Christian basilica by Pope Boniface IV in 609 and dedicated to the Virgin Mary and the Martyrs, thus enjoying papal protection through time that kept it from abandonment and destruction.
Etymologically the word “Pantheon” comes from the Greek words  “πᾶν”, “all” and “θεῖος”, “of, (or) relating to, all the gods”; however, according to Roman Senator Cassius Dio the term was, instead, to be intended more as a nickname referring either to the statues of gods surrounding the building or to the fact that the vault resembles the heavens.
An architectural wonder in the heart of Rome attributed to Syrian Architect Apollodorus of Damascus and described by Michelangelo as an “angelic and not human design”; 16 monolithic columns adorn the Pantheon’s pronaos while a massive 7 meter high bronze door opens to an unprecedented rotunda featuring an immense, one of a kind, concrete domed ceiling symbolizing the vault of heaven - unique in both dimensions and architecture - at its center a 9 meter oculus, the only source of natural light. To this day, it is still largest unsupported dome in the world, brilliantly lightened so that not only the thickness of the walls decreased as they reached the oculus, but also their weight as they were progressively built with lighter materials.
Admire this genius work of art now with our live cam broadcasting from the Rome!
Fun Facts
The site where the Pantheon stands is believed to be the exact location where Romolo, founder of Rome, was - upon death - grabbed by an eagle, carried to heaven and positioned amongst the Gods! Anciently, the heat waves generated by the candles lit inside the temple would lift towards the ceiling scattering the drops of rain that entering the oculus. Although clever, this system was not sufficient in cases of heavy rain, in fact, the floor beneath the oculus presents 22 holes designed to drain incoming water.
Cam on-line since: 03/09/2013

Comments

  • avatar
    • 4 weeks ago
    • Angela B

    So wonderful to see people out and about in the piazza <3

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Hanna Astephan

    Camera out of FOCUS,
    Hanna Astephan.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Peter Keddie

    @Debbie Morris
    Sorry to disappoint, but there are no bullet holes in the fascade of the Pantheon. The sandstone blocks you see were originally faced with marble slabs which were held to the sandstone by metal pins. Over the years acid rain has altered the appearance of the holes. I also had a guide tell me they were bullet holes and was not very happy when I told the group the truth.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Coraline

    5/21/2020 22:13
    Just read about a huge sinkhole that has appeared off to the right, revealing ancient paving stones (some from as far back as 27BC.

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Valerie Debrock-Speller

    It is so nice to see people here again, no longer deserted.

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Rodney Hutton

    Everytime I visit the Pantheon, I always stop by and say hello to Raphael and Annibale.

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • debbie morris

    one memory I have of the pantheon square is the amount of bullet holes in the pantheon and looking up inside the pantheon and seeing the sun shinning through the hole in the ceiling

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Medrado Calasans

    Cool, Peter!
    By revealing this, you do Hadrian justice!

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Peter Keddie

    In case anyone is interested, to the right, where the fencing is, a sink hole opened up a little while ago. Two metres down they found some flagstones from the original Hadrianic piazza. Although the Pantheon is inscribed with Marcus Agrippa, it was in fact completed by Hadrian and it was he who designed the dome.

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • Norberto

    @Ray, i saw a video someone asking in Brazil to a Pizza delivery guy if he know´s about Covid19, and his answer was: "you know that band that was playing at the end of the Titanic, we are the band!!" is answer was heartbreaking to me :(

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • Ray

    Pizza delivery guys on bikes looking lost. Funny to watch. This way then that. Sat nav must be on lockdown too.

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • Heather Harvey

    Christine Johnson - it is a butcher's shop/delicatessen so "essential food" supplier.

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • christine johnson

    What does that shop sell? Must be essential.

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • maggs

    i dont go out much and love to people watch round the world such a shame to see all these beautiful places empty

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • Mike W

    Our thoughts are with you Italia! Lunga vita all'Italia. Ti vogliamo bene!

  • avatar
    • 3 months ago
    • Sam

    Each day I check this webcam hoping, at last, to see the crowds of people return to the piazza. Nonetheless, it is heartening to see L'Antica Salumeria open and customers drift in one-by-one.