Marsaxlokk live camView of the Marsaxlokk bay with its seaside promenade

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Comments

  • avatar
    • 1 week ago
    • Bob C

    I don't know why they don't close the road to all traffic when the market is on, They stopped the buses from coming down to the front. Both pavements are mostly covered with the stalls or tables so you have got to walk in the road.

  • avatar
    • 3 weeks ago
    • Capture Sam

    29dec17-- A Thank You to our hosts, Pisces Restaurant Malta & 'Malta' Malta Tourism Authority, for sponsoring this 'live cam' view of the Marsaxlokk bay with its seaside promenade, splendid.

  • avatar
    • 3 weeks ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    it was swordfish steak for me this time certainly different from Cod and chips .gan canny.

  • avatar
    • 3 weeks ago
    • john cotton

    Rabbit stew in September. I remember it well Yummy yummy.

  • avatar
    • 3 weeks ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Christmas day and folks are still dining out in Marsaxlokk, gan canny.

  • avatar
    • 3 weeks ago
    • Mex

    This festive season is so much more than Christmas parties and gift giving. May your Christmas be filled with the true miracles and meaning of this beautiful time. May the joy and peace of Christmas be with you all through the Year 2018. Wishing you a season of blessings from heaven above. Happy Christmas!!

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Victor

    Probably the zig zag lines are EU regulations, does not mean that they have to be adhered to lol.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Bob C

    You know Derek I have been thinking about what you were told. If because of parking problems in the town and they are allowed to park on the zig zag lines, in that case why put them there in the first place. I recon you were told a little story because the boss was parked on them. I checked with a Maltese friend of mine and he has never heard of that.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Victor

    It seems that parking tickets are only issued to hired cars.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • Bob C

    Thanks Derek, I sometimes wonder if they have got any laws out there.

  • avatar
    • 1 month ago
    • DEREK JAMES BEVAN

    Bob C. I had lunch at the restaurant by the crossing a couple of weeks ago and while there I asked the waiter about the parking on the zigzag area,the white car is his bosses apparently due to the shortage of parking in the village the law allows parking on the zigzag area .so Gan canny folks.

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Bob C

    There are no parking places behind the zig zag lines this side of the road. Yes I agree the Maltese driver does make the rules up as he goes, only because the traffic police don't in-force what rules they do have.

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Frank Darmanin

    I was only pointing out that there are parking bays behind the zig zag lines. All rules and regulations are made up as you go along.

  • avatar
    • 2 months ago
    • Bob C

    Frank are the rules also different if you double park and are still on the zig zag lines and what about the yellow lines?

Marsaxlokk

Marsaxlokk is a picturesque fishing village in the south-eastern part of Malta, after all its name is related to the dry sirocco blowing from Sahara.

For a longtime an ideal place of refuge with waters deep enough to anchor, it was firstly inhabited by Phoenicians who landed here during the 9th century BC; today it certainly is worth a visit, walking through the sea scented streets while enjoying unforgettable views of the bay will be a great experience!

Dependent on tourism as source of revenue, Marsaxlokk also boasts a thriving fishing industry with a port that is one of the largest and prettiest in Malta; the daily catch is usually distributed to other Maltese areas but also directly retailed on the quay in occasion of the famous fish market taking place on Sunday and attracting locals and tourists from all over Malta; the fish market may be a good opportunity to closely appreciate the brightly colourful and traditional fishing boats "luzzus" (Il-Luzzu), that make Marsaxlokk famous around the world; painted or carved on the bow of these solid wooden boats, the so-called Eyes of Osiris are believed to protect the boats and their fishermen from danger and misfortunes; the lovely seaside promenade allows both visitors and locals to enjoy them moored in the bay or scattered hither and thither, their bright colours, especially in the sunshine and at sunrise, create so wonderful light effects that we all will be totally captured by the extraordinary beauty of the bay, really a great emotion; this contributes to make Marsaxlokk the ideal place to stay and relax, its streets, old houses and surroundings give a sensation of peace and quitness that let it still retain that typical fishing village atmosphere. Marsaxlokk originated as a fishing village, however it still retains much of its charming origins to this day blending with a plenty of modern facilities and excellent fish restaurants, most of them lined up the picturesque promenade, enjoying the smell of fresh seafood or delicious chef creations while wandering around will be really fantastic, moreover it will be extremely easy to encounter fishermen marked by fatigue unloading the catch, sewing their nets or repairing their luzzus and have a little talk with them.

Marsaxlokk offers some must-see attractions that shouldn’t be left off our Maltese itinerary such as the stunning Church of Our Lady of Pompeii, between its two towers stands the statue of the Virgin in a traditional luzzu boat overlooking the bay or, for snorkelling and swimming lovers, the splendid Blue Grotto (Taht il-Hnejja) and the clear waters of St. Peter's Pool while for nature lovers will be a great pleasure to visit the hill of Tas-Silġ, which contains remains of megalithic temples, but it doesn't end here...other two places of interest and tourist attractions are the St. Lucian Fort (Torri ta' San Lucjan), built in 1610 by the Knight of St. John and the wonderful Fort Delimara (Fortizza ta' Delimara), constructed in 1881 by the British to protect Marsaxlokk.

Cam on-line since: 07/22/2013