Zambia - African Animals live camElephants, zebras, lions, monkeys and other African animals live from Mwamba Bush Camp's 'Last Waterhole Hide'

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  • avatar
    • 5 hours ago
    • Adrian Allain

    @ Jenni Money
    Yes Jenni. I've seen a tourist 'jeep' at the hippo hide. I'll post a photo on that page.

  • avatar
    • 5 hours ago
    • Maureen Futerill

    It must be hard to watch the animals that are stuck,and not to rush out there to help
    . But I understand the need for safety for you ,your staff and the animals involved.
    You all do a great job, and thank you for all the info you are passing on to us

  • avatar
    • 6 hours ago
    • Sharron Reynolds

    Thanks Juliet. That makes absolute sense. You just cannot go in and have wardens or others lives at stake. Thank you for this wonderful camera (and the hippo one). It is a great success especially to folk who would otherwise not see these animals and in their natural habitat. You all do a great job! :) :)

  • avatar
    • 6 hours ago
    • Juliet Shenton

    Hi @JenniMoney, this camera is located deep inside the South Luangwa National Park at one of our (Shenton Safaris) camps. We have positioned it on our photographic hide at our Last Waterhole, which is inside Mwamba Bush Camp. Over the 26 years we have been operating we have been able to save many animals when they have become stuck in local waterholes inside the National Park. We are all animal lovers at Shenton Safaris, and can't bear to see animals suffer. This is not a private concession (piece of land), it is national park and it is therefore under the jurisdiction of the Department of National Parks (DNP) whose instructions we must follow. In order for us to mount a rescue we have to first inform the DNP about the situation and request their permission to mount a rescue mission. National Parks authorities have never failed to grant us permission, but sometimes it can take a little time to get the answer whilst they assess the risk, which can be stressful when you're on the ground. We once came across 19 buffalo stuck in a lagoon bed, vultures and lions were starting to eat them alive. DNP gave us permission to rescue and we were able to save 13 of them. With a baby elephant there is the very serious risk of the mother killing the people trying to save her calf. If that were to happen she would be deemed a dangerous animal and as a result the decision would likely be made by authorities to shoot her, which would mean dead calf, dead mother and seriously traumatised herd (not to mention dead people). So the authorities have to take all these risks into account when they make their decision. I hope that explains the situation. You can rest assured that the minute we know an animal has become stuck we are in touch with the authorities trying to get the necessary permissions in place.

  • avatar
    • 7 hours ago
    • jenni money

    Thank you for answering my question this morning. Has anybody ever seen the rangers

  • avatar
    • 9 hours ago
    • Dee

    I'm watching the Fish Eagle which I've not seen before, so a first for me. :-) I was watching the baby elephant earlier on, which was trying to free itself from the mud, although the female elephant next to it seemed to be keeping a good eye on it. Nice watchign the Zebra, too..and the young foal.

  • avatar
    • 9 hours ago
    • Linda Seuneke

    The fish eagle is in attendance

  • avatar
    • 9 hours ago
    • cab admin

    Zebra are back

  • avatar
    • 9 hours ago
    • Ruby

    Anyone seen the lions recently? I think I get up too late!!

  • avatar
    • 9 hours ago
    • VOISENAT

    13h24 zèbres

  • avatar
    • 10 hours ago
    • enbeejay

    Photo now showing of the baby elephant up to its tummy in mud.

  • avatar
    • 10 hours ago
    • Shelley

    Jenni, I asked a while ago if animals ever have to be rescued and they told me they do sometimes have to go in and help. I too get worried when I see them get bogged down but so far they have always managed to free themselves.

  • avatar
    • 11 hours ago
    • jenni money

    So concerned this morning watching the baby elephant struggle out of the mud. Can someone tell me if they are monitored by Wardens. Would they go to help if an animal was in distress.

  • avatar
    • 11 hours ago
    • enbeejay

    That baby elephant had a very hard job unsticking itself from the mud. It had me pulling with it. It got free in the end, while being watched over by another elephant.